Sunday Worship 14th June 2020 – First Sunday after Trinity

Welcome to worship today. As usual, there is a playlist set up at the top to play the whole service, including hymns. Or you can go down the page and play each video separately, or read the words if you prefer.

If you are reading this before Sunday morning at 11.30am, please join us at our Zoom Coffee. Details available from Revd Liz.

Service written out

Hymn

In the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.
Amen

The Lord be with you
And also with you

Lord, direct our thoughts, and teach us to pray.
Lift up our hearts to worship you in spirit and in truth,
through Jesus Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Confession

Keep silence and reflect on the week

Your love gives us life.
We fail to live as your children.

Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.

You call us to do good.
We seek our own good.

Christ, have mercy. Christ have mercy.

You hear us when we cry for help.
We ignore the cries of others.

Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy

May the Father of all mercies
cleanse us from our sins,
and restore us in his image
to the praise and glory of his name,
through Jesus Christ our Lord.
Amen

The Collect

O God,
the strength of all those who put their trust in you,
mercifully accept our prayers
and, because through the weakness of our mortal nature
we can do no good thing without you,
grant us the help of your grace,
that in the keeping of your commandments
we may please you both in will and deed;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Reading – Psalm 100

Read in your own bible or click below to hear it read.
https://www.biblegateway.com/audio/suchet/nivuk/Ps.100

Hymn

Gospel reading

Matthew 9:35 – 10:8

Sermon – Revd Dr Stephen Pope

As most of you know, the Anglican church likes to think in terms of Ordinary Time and Seasonal Time. Seasonal Time is those periods when we concentrate on special times in the Christian Calendar. There is the Advent and Christmas season. We have just spent about three months in the run of the seasons of Ash Wednesday and Lent through Easter and leading up to Pentecost, finally capping it with Trinity Sunday, which was last week.

Now in the church we are back to Ordinary Time – but it’s not Ordinary Time as we know it. We can’t go inside our church buildings to worship – not on our own, nor as a community. And in the wider world we are in lockdown, which we were sort of getting used to, but now it is being slowly lifted and so routines are changing again. Many of us are longing to be able to see friends and families again, especially the grandchildren. The current racial tensions are not helping either.

And because of all this, and more, somewhere inside of us, and in all sorts of ways, including missing church, we feel lost.

Lost and confused, not knowing when we be able to worship together again. Not being able to join in with our communities in singing God’s praises, with confessing together and hearing the words of forgiveness and absolution together. Not able to receive Holy Communion together. Not able to share news and gossip after the services, no tea, no coffee, no biscuits, not even a special dispensation for Welsh cakes .

Lost, confused, half helpless, knowing something just isn’t right.

What do we do?

To start with, did you notice the parallel with what Jesus noticed about the crowds following Him in our gospel reading?

Matthew records that they were ‘harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd’? What does that mean? It means they were cut off from how they were supposed to live happy and harmonious lives as individuals, as families, as towns and villages and as a nation because the equivalent of a virus had got into the teaching of many of their religious leaders, because those leaders had misunderstood God’s priorities when they interpreted God’s laws.

Like, it was more important to keep the Sabbath than to rescue your animals from danger or accidents. Like it was more important to spend time tithing their garden herbs than to spend time and energy making sure the poor had their rights under the law upheld.

Jesus’ teaching was radically different. People recognised this and were thirsty for more. They noticed Jesus had authority over physical illnesses, and unclean spirits as well, which the lawyers and Pharisees didn’t.

Jesus could see that they were like a sheep without a shepherd. But then, why did he change metaphor and tell the disciples they should ask the Lord of the harvest to send labourers into his harvest?

I find it helpful to remember that to the Jews, David, their first King true to God, was also a shepherd, and the harvest is that of people coming into, not so much David’s kingdom, but people coming into God’s kingdom, where they will obey His laws with Love as their priority.

So when Jesus told the disciples they needed to ask the Lord of the harvest to send labourers into the harvest, he was saying there needed to be more people doing what He was doing – sharing the good news of God’s kingdom, one that was linked with healing.

Jesus also wanted the disciples to pray and told them to do just that…..pray so that their prayers would touch God’s heart….. and ultimately this would touch their hearts too.

How do we know this? Because Matthew tells us Jesus had compassion for those in the crowds. He recognised that they were feeling harassed and that they were feeling helpless. And it is when we have felt harassed and/or helpless ourselves that we are most likely to recognise it in others and therefore, being aware of it, be able to pray compassionately to God for them.

Compassion may mean being moved greatly. A dramatic example would be the story of the raising of Lazarus. It was not after the theological discussion Jesus had with Martha but seeing Mary weeping that moved Jesus to tears too, and that led to the raising of Lazarus.

Compassion doesn’t always lead to tears – sometimes it means hard graft at making friends with someone despite initially being ignored or rejected. Sometimes it means persistence, patience and gentleness. Sometimes it means doing something that is not our preferred way, purely out of love, so that others can see that Christianity is for real life, not for running away from it.

There are reports people are exploring church in a way they haven’t been doing before, partly because there is so much of it online with our church building being shut up. When we are allowed back into the church buildings for services again, is there scope for making attractiveness for newcomers a higher priority.

There are often no quick or easy answers to these questions. But how we need to look for them.

In our gospel reading, we were told that Jesus told his disciples to pray.

In these strange days, when we are feeling lost about all sorts of things, this is a clue as to where would be a good place to start – spending time praying. It’s not only about praying for others – first we need to know, or sense, God’s compassion for ourselves. Then we can share in His compassion for others, which makes it easier to recognise how we can help ourselves and our neighbours to walk more closely with Him. Remembering that Prayer is Conversation, and so leaving time at the end to listen is also good. I’ve even known having a good argument with God lead me to an aspect of Him I hadn’t been aware of before, and so to an improved relationship with Him.

Finally, however fast or slowly things happen, we can still rejoice as we remember that God wants His Kingdom to grow – and He wants us to share in the work and the glory of it.

Amen.

Affirmation of faith

Let us declare our faith in God.

We believe in God the Father,
from whom every family
in heaven and on earth is named.

We believe in God the Son,
who lives in our hearts through faith,
and fills us with his love.

We believe in God the Holy Spirit,
who strengthens us with power from on high.

We believe in one God; Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Amen.

Hymn

Intercessions

We pray that Christ may be seen in the life of the Church.

Jesus, Lord of the Church,
in your mercy, hear us.

You have called us into the family of those who are
the children of God.
May our love for our brothers and sisters
be strengthened by your grace.

Jesus, Lord of the Church,
in your mercy, hear us.

You have called us to be a temple
where the Holy Spirit can dwell.
Give us clean hands and pure hearts,
so that our lives will reflect your holiness.

Jesus, Lord of the Church,
in your mercy, hear us.

You have called us to be a light to the world,
so that those in darkness come to you.
May our lives shine
as a witness to the saving grace you have given for all.

Jesus, Lord of the Church,
in your mercy, hear us.

You have called us to be members of your body,
so that when one suffers, all suffer together.
We ask for your comfort and healing power
to bring hope to those in distress.

Jesus, Lord of the Church,
in your mercy, hear us.

You have called us to be the Bride,
where you, Lord, are the Bridegroom.
Prepare us for the wedding feast,
where we will be united with you for ever.

Jesus, Lord of the Church,
hear our prayer,
and make us one in heart and mind
to serve you with joy for ever.
Amen.

The Lord’s Prayer

Let us pray with confidence as our Saviour has taught us

Our Father, who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name;
thy kingdom come;
thy will be done;
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread.
And forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us.
And lead us not into temptation;
but deliver us from evil.
For thine is the kingdom,
the power and the glory,
for ever and ever.
Amen.

Offertory Prayer

Holy Spirit, we thank you for coming upon the Church and inhabiting the lives of Christian disciples. We offer you these financial gifts in gratitude and to express our desire for all your gifts to us to bear fruit in our lives. Amen

Blessing and Sending Out

May Christ’s holy, healing and enabling Spirit
be with you and guide you on your way
at every change and turn;
and the blessing of God Almighty,
the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit,
be among you and remain with you always.
Amen

Go in peace, to love and serve the Lord
In the name of Christ, Amen.

Hymn

Copyright Notices

Scripture taken from the Holy Bible, NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION®, NIV® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.

Common Worship, material from which is included in this service, is copyright © The Archbishops’ Council.

Sunday Worship 7th June 2020 – Trinity Sunday

Welcome to worship today. As usual, there is a playlist set up at the top to play the whole service, including hymns. Or you can go down the page and play each video separately, or read the words if you prefer.

If you are reading this before Sunday morning at 11.30am, please join us at our Zoom Coffee. Details available from Revd Liz.

Service written out

In the name of the Father,
and of the Son,
and of the Holy Spirit.
Amen.

Grace, mercy and peace
from God our Father
and the Lord Jesus Christ be with you.
And also with you.

Prayer of preparation

Almighty God,
to whom all hearts are open,
all desires known,
and from whom no secrets are hidden:
cleanse the thoughts of our hearts
by the inspiration of your Holy Spirit,
that we may perfectly love you,
and worthily magnify your holy name;
through Christ our Lord. Amen.

Our Lord Jesus Christ said:
The first commandment is this:
‘Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God is the only Lord.
You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart,
with all your soul, with all your mind,
and with all your strength.’
The second is this: ‘Love your neighbour as yourself.’
There is no other commandment greater than these.
On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.
Amen. Lord, have mercy.

Prayers of Penitence

God the Father forgives us in Christ and heals us by the Holy Spirit.
Let us therefore put away all anger and bitterness,
all slander and malice,
and confess our sins to God our redeemer.

Silence

Most merciful God,
Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,
we confess that we have sinned
in thought, word and deed.
We have not loved you with our whole heart.
We have not loved our neighbours as ourselves.
In your mercy
forgive what we have been,
help us to amend what we are,
and direct what we shall be;
that we may do justly, love mercy,
and walk humbly with you, our God.
Amen.

Almighty God, who forgives all who truly repent,
have mercy upon us,
pardon and deliver us from all our sins,
confirm and strengthen us in all goodness,
and keep us in life eternal;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

Collect – Prayer for the week

Almighty and everlasting God,
you have given us your servants grace,
by the confession of a true faith,
to acknowledge the glory of the eternal Trinity
and in the power of the divine majesty to worship the Unity:
keep us steadfast in this faith,
that we may evermore be defended from all adversities;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen

Bible reading

Isaiah 40: 12-17,

Isaiah 40: 27-31

Hymn

Take my life – not the tune I am most familiar with, but I really like it and if you want to see the words you will need to select Closed captioning

Gospel

Hear the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew
Glory to you, O Lord.

Matthew 28: 16-20

This is the Gospel of the Lord.
Praise to you, O Christ.

Sermon – The Revd Liz Hassall

When I say the word God, I wonder what it makes you think of. God. What image is in your mind right now? If we were in church I would be asking you to respond aloud and share it because I can guarantee that whatever image is in your mind would be different to that of other people. When we talk about God we bring a whole bundle of memories and stories and concepts to the table.

We can talk of God the creator, who made all things, Father God, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, The God who put the rainbow in the sky over Noah’s ark, the God who guided David to defeat Goliath. The God who appeared to the abandoned woman Hagar and saved her and her son Ishmael, the God who is the still small voice.

We can talk of God the redeemer. Jesus, who lived on earth, growing from infant to adult, a radical teacher who cut through niceties to speak against injustice, who challenged the religious leaders of the day and spent time with those cast out from society, who died and rose again, who gave himself up so our sins can be forgiven.

We can talk about God the Holy Spirit, who we celebrated last week with tongues of flame, who appears as a Dove showing us the way to peace, who whispers in our minds and draws us closer to the way God would have us follow.

All these ideas and stories come together in that one word. God. God is more than we can imagine, God is a celebration in diversity, God is for everyone and we are all made in the image of God. Today is Trinity Sunday and we celebrate the unity of God seen in the trinity of Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Trinity is not just an obscure doctrine. It tells us more about God, and helps us to see how God relates to us.

This week, we have all seen some of the consequences of racism, which have been evident following the killing of George Floyd in America. Now I can’t speak about the impact of racism – it isn’t my place to do that. As a white person, however, it is my place to speak up and say that racism is fundamentally wrong and fundamentally opposed to the gospel of Jesus Christ which we follow and we have to do something about it.

The passage from the Gospel of Matthew which we heard today is the very end of the Gospel. The final words. It is Jesus’ last message to his disciples and it is uncompromising in its inclusivity.

The word ALL is there four times. Jesus is given ALL authority. The disciples are told to make disciples of ALL nations, baptising them and teaching them ALL the things commanded by Jesus and Jesus will be with us for ALL the days. Some translations reword it, but it’s clear in the original language.

What does this inclusivity mean? It means that Jesus is for everyone, always, everywhere. His good news is good news for everyone, always, everywhere. The invitation to baptism is for everyone always, everywhere.

But it is not enough just to say that. It is easy to say that Church is for everyone but, unless we listen to the people who are excluded, and act to include them, those are just empty words.

We are all made in the image of God. When we look around at a group of people, each person there is made in the image of God and, as we piece together our knowledge of those people, we get closer to understanding what it means to be in the image of God. Any time that we exclude or drive away a person or group of people, we are missing the gift of God which is in them.

But that makes it sound as if the tragedy of racism is all about what we miss out on, which it isn’t. Racism is about a society which is unfair, unjust, and cruel. We are part of a system where the colour of your skin affects your life expectancy as well as many other aspects of life. As a white person, my life is easier, and I have done nothing to deserve that.

So what are we meant to do about it? First we are meant to listen – listen to the stories of those who experience racism and understand that it isn’t just happening over on the other side of the world but here too and not just in the cities either but out here in our villages.

Second, we should pray, and in doing so learn more of the abundant love of God, Father Son and Holy Spirit, for all of God’s children. Ask God to show us where we are complicit in a racist society and change it.

Thirdly, we should be brave enough to work against injustice, to build a Church and a society in our own communities that is actively anti-racist. This week our archbishops stated that “racism is an affront to God. It is born out of ignorance and must be eradicated. We all bear the responsibility and must play our part to eliminate this scourge on humanity.

At the very simplest level, it is not allowing racist remarks from family and friends to go unchallenged, but we can do much more. I will leave you to think about what that might be.

And in all this we have to be prepared to be told repeatedly that we aren’t getting it right and we have to take that with good grace and not be discouraged.

I started by talking about God. About all the different ways we can meet God and know God. And when we know God, we then have responsibility in joining in with the work of His body on earth, His Church. We are the inheritors of Jesus’ promises to his disciples. We have the responsibility to teach all that Jesus commanded to all nations: to teach that gospel of love and inclusion for the outcast and abandoned, and that gospel of challenge to those in positions of power and privilege. And in all that we can be confident that Jesus will be with us always, to the very end of the age.

Creed

We believe in one God, the Father, the Almighty,
maker of heaven and earth, of all that is,
seen and unseen.
We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ,
the only Son of God,
eternally begotten of the Father,
God from God, Light from Light,
true God from true God, begotten, not made,
of one Being with the Father;
through him all things were made.
For us and for our salvation he came down from heaven, was incarnate from the Holy Spirit and the Virgin Mary and was made man.
For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate;
he suffered death and was buried.
On the third day he rose again
in accordance with the Scriptures;
he ascended into heaven
and is seated at the right hand of the Father.
He will come again in glory to judge
the living and the dead,
and his kingdom will have no end.
We believe in the Holy Spirit,
the Lord, the giver of life,
who proceeds from the Father and the Son,
who with the Father and the Son is
worshipped and glorified,
who has spoken through the prophets.
We believe in one holy catholic and apostolic Church.
We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness of sins.
We look for the resurrection of the dead,
and the life of the world to come.
Amen.

Intercessions – led by Sian

Response: God of love, hear our prayer

Closing prayer –
O God beyond us, give us faith.
O God, beside us, give us peace.

O God within us, give us life.
Ever One, Sacred Three, Holy God the Trinity. Amen.

The Lord’s Prayer

Today, I am using the traditional language Lord’s prayer. Please pray in whichever language or version you prefer.

Let us pray with confidence as our Saviour has taught us

Our Father, who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name,
thy kingdom come,
thy will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread.
And forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us.
And lead us not into temptation;
but deliver us from evil.
For thine is the kingdom,
the power and the glory,
for ever and ever. Amen.

Offertory Prayer

Almighty God, we worship in the name of the one to whom all authority is given – Jesus Christ.  As we offer you this money, you ask us to renew our commitment to be your faith-filled disciples.  May our lifestyles reflect a desire to be in mission for others.  In the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, we pray.  Amen.

The Peace

Peace to you from God our heavenly Father.
Peace from his Son Jesus Christ who is our peace.
Peace from the Holy Spirit, the life-giver.
The peace of the triune God be always with you
and also with you.

If we were in Church today, I would be making an announcement. I know many of you will already have heard this from the notice sheet, but I thought I would say it here too.

Dr John Sentamu, Archbishop of York, is pleased to announce the
appointment of the Revd Liz Hassall as Priest-in-Charge of the York
City Centre Group, comprising St Olave with St Giles, St Denys, St
Helen Stonegate with St Martin Coney Street, and All Saints
Pavement with St Crux and St Michael Spurriergate. This is fully
endorsed by the Representatives of these parishes.
Liz is currently Rector of Coxwold with Husthwaite, and Crayke with
Brandsby and Yearsley, having been ordained deacon and priest in
this Diocese.
Liz writes, “I am delighted to have been offered the post of Priest-in- Charge at the City Centre Group and I am looking forward to taking
up this new challenge, trusting in the Spirit to lead us all in our
worship and mission in the City of York.”
Subject to any public health restrictions, Liz will be licensed to her
new role in the days leading up to Christmas 2020.

That’s the end of the statement. I know for many of you, this will have come as a shock. We have been so happy here in these villages and it will be a real wrench to leave here. However, as I followed God’s calling in coming more than seven years ago, so I am also following in leaving. I am excited and looking forward to new things, but there are still six months until we leave and I hope in that time to be able to work hard here in discovering what our church communities will look like following the pandemic. I’m really grateful for all the messages of support that I have received. There will be time for goodbyes later. In the mean-time please pray for us as a family of churches, for our family and for the City Centre.

Blessing and Dismissal

God the Holy Trinity make you strong in faith and love,
defend you on every side,
and guide you in truth and peace;
and the blessing of God Almighty,
the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit,
be with you and remain with you always.
Amen

Go in peace, to love and serve the Lord
In the name of Christ, Amen.

Copyright Notices

Scripture taken from the Holy Bible, NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION®, NIV® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.

Common Worship, material from which is included in this service, is copyright © The Archbishops’ Council.